Entrepreneurship
Entrepreneurship
Patents and the Independent Inventor Lifecycle
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Patents and the Independent Inventor Lifecycle

In this paper, we leverage the first randomized control trial of inventors at the USPTO to demonstrate that granted patent rights provide substantial benefits to independent inventors. We also find that the nature of these benefits differs by inventor type. For financially-constrained Pro se inventors from the USPTO experiment, patents act as a signal and increase the likelihood of affiliation. For the broader set of independent inventors, however, patents reduce financial, informational, and commercialization frictions and increase subsequent inventive activity.

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Medias of the same institution

This article explores the contribution of psychological entrepreneurial support, based on same-gender group mentoring, to the strengthening of female entrepreneurial intention in the specific context of a women-only incubator. According to the literature on female entrepreneurship, women entrepreneurs are faced with specific challenges that influence their entrepreneurial intention such as a lack of self-confidence, caused by gender stereotypes, and conflict between family life and entrepreneurial career. More precisely, our research aims to determine how psychological entrepreneurial support is implemented in the incubation process to overcome these specific challenges, and the mechanisms for strengthening female entrepreneurial intention analyzed at both intrapersonal and interpersonal levels. We discuss the implications of our findings on related research into business incubators and the design of mentoring programs adapted to the needs of women entrepreneurs.
DUCHEMIN Marie-Hélène - EM Normandie |
BUENO MERINO Pascale - EM Normandie |
Curious about the intricate dance top-tier firms perform as they navigate between exploring new horizons and exploiting existing strengths? This delicate balance isn't just vital—it's the secret ingredient driving sustainable success in today's fast-paced business world.
SHUWAIKH Fatima - EMLV |
CHAUDHURI Ranjan - EMLV |
Based on institutional theory and the dynamic capability view, this study delves into the relationship between a firm’s climate change adaptation (CCA) capability and its performance, with a focus on the mediating influence of business-to-business (B2B) marketing capability. The study poses two main research questions: RQ1: What role do institutional pressures play in fostering CCA capability among B2B firms in both developed and developing countries? RQ2: How does the CCA capability of B2B firms impact their performance? To validate the theoretical model developed, data is collected through surveys conducted in a developed country (Australia) and a developing country (South Africa). The study holds significance on two fronts: (a) being among the first to examine the influence of institutional pressures on CCA capability development, and (b) uncovering the mediating role of marketing capability in enhancing B2B firm performance through CCA capability. The study’s novel contribution lies in identifying pivotal elements for driving exceptional B2B firm performance amidst climate change, while employing institutional theory and the dynamic capability view to elucidate underlying mechanisms.
BAG Surajit - EMLV |

Medias of the same thematics

This article explores the contribution of psychological entrepreneurial support, based on same-gender group mentoring, to the strengthening of female entrepreneurial intention in the specific context of a women-only incubator. According to the literature on female entrepreneurship, women entrepreneurs are faced with specific challenges that influence their entrepreneurial intention such as a lack of self-confidence, caused by gender stereotypes, and conflict between family life and entrepreneurial career. More precisely, our research aims to determine how psychological entrepreneurial support is implemented in the incubation process to overcome these specific challenges, and the mechanisms for strengthening female entrepreneurial intention analyzed at both intrapersonal and interpersonal levels. We discuss the implications of our findings on related research into business incubators and the design of mentoring programs adapted to the needs of women entrepreneurs.
DUCHEMIN Marie-Hélène - EM Normandie |
BUENO MERINO Pascale - EM Normandie |
Curious about the intricate dance top-tier firms perform as they navigate between exploring new horizons and exploiting existing strengths? This delicate balance isn't just vital—it's the secret ingredient driving sustainable success in today's fast-paced business world.
SHUWAIKH Fatima - EMLV |
When time is of the essence and teams face unexpected contextual changes, they must adapt quickly, sometimes even in real time, that is, they may have to improvise. This paper adopts an inductive approach to explore how teams decide to engage in improvised adaptation, and what happens during those processes for improvisation to be successful. The study analyzes improvisation from the perspective of paradox theory and identifies six paradoxical tensions driven by these contexts: deployment, development, temporal, procedural, structural, and behavioral tensions. We propose a dynamic equilibrium model of team improvised adaptation that leads to team plasticity.
ABRANTES Antonio - TBS Education |
The concept of an ‘entrepreneurial ecosystem’ has become a major means for both theorizing and making policy decisions concerning entrepreneurship, innovation and economic development. The notion of an entrepreneurial ecosystem captures the way in which entrepreneurship is increasingly performed and undertaken via the innate interdependencies existing between the elements and components of what are essentially biotic communities (consisting of complex interactions between human agents and an array of tangible and intangible components). This book takes a multi-lensed view and perspective on the emergence of entrepreneurship within ecosystems in cities and regions, the manner in which these ecosystems evolve and operate, as well as their future development. This introductory chapter provides some initial theoretical background relating the nature of ecosystems in the context of entrepreneurship and urban and regional development before providing a summary of the book’s three parts: (1) The Emergence of Entrepreneurial Ecosystems; (2) The Evolution of Entrepreneurial Ecosystems; and (3) The Future of Entrepreneurial Ecosystems.
THEODORAKI Christina - FNEGE |